ORS Research - Global Participation Map


UBC Okanagan Research

The Office of Research Services at the University of British Columbia provides an interactive map of the research projects taking place around the globe. Points of interest include Faculty, Graduate and Undergraduate projects. Researchers can display there projects on this map by registering with the site. Any project place-marks associated with a UBC researcher will automatically become editable to them.

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Undergraduate Projects


UBC Okanagan Research

Place-marks in this layer represent projects, conference presentations, posters etc, created by students

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Understanding Hypertension as experienced by Zambian adults and their Health Care Professionals


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Photo One - Understanding Hypertension as experienced by Zambian adults and their Health Care Professionals Photo Two - Understanding Hypertension as experienced by Zambian adults and their Health Care Professionals

Non-Comumunicable Diseases (NCD's) have surpassed infectious diseases as a leading cause of death in Africa. It has been predicted that the incidence of chronic diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes will rapidly increase in Africa in the near future. A team of Canadian and Zambian Health Care workers, lead by Fay Karp, have been working together in Mongu, Western Province, Zambia for the past four years. Due to the shortage of health care professionals in Zamiba, running clinics such as the Out-Patient department of the Lewenika Hospital in Mongu has proven to be difficult with the increase of diabetic and hypertension Zambian clients. Clients are presented with little understanding of how to prevent or treat their hypertension. This research group of health care professionals is interested in health promotion education, regarding health lifestyle choices, prevention of hypertension and improved treatment protocols for hypertension in rural Zambia.

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Assessing Positive Well-Being of Children in Zambia


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Photo One - Assessing Positive Well-Being of Children in Zambia Photo Two - Assessing Positive Well-Being of Children in Zambia

Undergraduate student Tim Krupa wants to understand what makes children happy, so he trekked across the world to Zambia to seek answers. Traditional research in psychology and medicine focuses on illness, dysfunction, and treatment, whereas positive psychology research is strengths-based and focuses on positive well-being. The majority of positive psychology studies are with North American and European adults. Tim's study focuses on children in Zambia. After travel to Africa to create sports clubs for youth in impoverished communities through an International Education Travel Subsidy, which is offered by the Irving K. Barber School of Arts & Science, Tim observed that these children experience high levels of happiness, despite extreme challenges including parental loss, disease, poverty, and reduced opportunities. His study measures children's happiness, life satisfaction and demographic variables to identify predictors of well-being. His findings will be compared to assessments of North American children to develop global learning on the subject.

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Writing a Language, Voicing a People: Creating an Orthography for Nabit


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Photo One - Writing a Language, Voicing a People: Creating an Orthography for Nabit Photo Two - Writing a Language, Voicing a People: Creating an Orthography for Nabit

Within Ghana, there are 79 recognized languages, not including dialects. Undergraduate student Robyn Giffen's research in Ghana will focus on the Nabit language, which is considered a dialect of Farefare. There are five major dialects of Farefare, each very distinct from the others. Gurenne, one of these dialects, is considered the most similar to Nabit, though a Nabit-speaker cannot understand Gurenne. Currently in Northern Ghana, students are educated in either English or Gurenne. Approximately 45% of the population ages 15 and older of Northern Ghana are illiterate.Robyn worked to create a writing system for the language of Nabit. She wanted to answer the proposed question of: What is the most effective writing system to represent all of the sounds in the language of Nabit and how can it contribute to improving literacy? By working with fluent speaker of Nabit, Vida Yakong, Robyn created a language tool so that the writing system can be used in the adult literacy program and potentially in the education system of Northern Ghana.https://news.ok.ubc.ca/2012/11/05/ubc-researchers-create-alphabet-for-endangered-language-in-ghana/http://www.ubc.ca/okanagan/ikbarberschool/Robyn_Giffen_U21.html

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Faculty Projects


UBC Okanagan Research

Faculty Place-marks contain high quality research projects and generally include external partnerships and receive government funding

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Kala Vernacular Education and Local Ecological Knowledge Project


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Photo One - Kala Vernacular Education and Local Ecological Knowledge Project Photo Two - Kala Vernacular Education and Local Ecological Knowledge Project

Dr. Christine Schreyer and Dr. John Wagner work in partnership with the Kala Language Committee to create school curriculum resource materials, dictionaries and other written documents in the Kala language. They are also working with the Kala Language Committee to record oral history narratives and ecological knowledge as recounted by Kala elders and knowledge experts. The Kala Language Committee consists of three individuals from each of the Kala speaking villages who are concerned about the language shift occurring in their communities. As English is the official language for instruction in Papua New Guinea (PNG), vernacular language has been in danger of being lost. However, during the 1990's the national education policy in PNG was changed to encourage the use of vernacular language in the first three years of schooling. To assist villages in preserving their native language, Drs. Schreyer and Wagner continue to document cultural and ecological knowledge. This knowledge is being incorporated into curriculum materials that could be included in lesson plans, for subjects such as history, science, math and language, for the local Kala language schools.Another goal of this project is to hold workshops that will continue to train community members in the use of the standardised orthography, the development of curriculum materials and the recording of local ecological knowledge and oral literature. Providing computers, hand-held video cameras and solar powered batteries to each village will also be funded from this project.The Kala language community consists of six villages in Morobe Province in Papua New Guinea: Manidala, Lambu, Apoze, Kamiali, Alẽso and Kui

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Palliative Care Without Borders


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Photo One - Palliative Care Without Borders Photo Two - Palliative Care Without Borders

According to a recent study by the Canadian Institute for Health Information, almost three quarters of British Columbians who die are not identified as people who could benefit from services associated with palliative care. Dying, when complicated by uncontrolled symptoms and without sufficient support and resources, leaves traumatic memories for all involved. Dr. Pesut and community-based Rural Integrated Palliative Approach Team (RIPAT) aim to provide high quality, integrated palliative care for individuals with chronic limiting illness in the communities of Trail and Castlegar. The objectives of RIPAT are: to provide early identification of, and support for, persons with life-limiting illness and their care providers; to provide a central and accessible Point for contact information and support available 24/7; and to establish an accountability process to monitor the quality of the dying experience. This approach involves how to best prepare nurses, taking into account their work environment and skill mix. As a result of RIPAT, the quality of healthcare, and ultimately the quality of life will be improved for dying individuals and their families.

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Nursing students help with health care in Ghana


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Photo One - Nursing students help with health care in Ghana Photo Two - Nursing students help with health care in Ghana

Working with colleagues in Zambia and Ghana, nursing students from UBC’s Okanagan campus often find what they experience changes their understanding of what it means to be a nurse. Each year, a group of fourth-year nursing students at UBC’s Okanagan campus travel to Ghana or Zambia for six weeks, consolidating four years of nursing theory and practice into one practicum. They work in a variety of clinical settings, including medical and surgical units, pediatrics and maternity, HIV clinics and community health outreach in remote villages.“One of the most important aspects of this experience is the community development model we embrace—we are not there to fix problems or tell the Zambians or Ghanaians what they need,” says Muriel Kranabetter, associate professor of nursing. “We assist as colleagues and follow their lead as to what supports them in their needs and objectives.” Twenty five UBCO students travelled to Zambia last spring. Eighteen others went to Ghana. Students on their trip work in General Hospitals in a variety of areas, including the HIV clinic. Alongside two Zambian nurses and a few Zambian clinicians, some students attend to 150-200 HIV patients a day. Smith also worked in the villages of Chunga and Mukambi. One of their Zambian partners says what the UBC nurses lack in familiarity with local conditions is more than offset by their knowledge in other areas and ability to respond quickly to changing situations.“The collaboration with Canadians has helped to improve nursing care by providing audit and quality assurance in areas such as patient monitoring, critical-care nursing and neonatal resuscitation,” says Dr. Seke Kazuma, a medical officer from Lewanika General Hospital in Mongu.“One thing I like about Canadian nurses is they are sharp and know how to respond to emergencies. They may not have a lot of experience with tropical diseases and infectious conditions, but they are well trained.”Students accepted into the practicum in Ghana and Zambia cover their own $5,000 travel expenses, but they can apply for a $1,000 grant through UBC’s Go Global program. In addition, nursing students fundraise approximately $10,000 annually to support health care in Africa.Among the biggest challenges is finding funding, says Karp. Committed financing would ensure that fourth-year nursing students get the international experience, and allow the School of Nursing to continue supporting the work of colleagues and partners within Zambia and Ghana.The School of Nursing plans to increase practicum placements through local connections and partnerships in Africa, develop potential student and faculty exchanges with the University of Zambia, and create additional collaborative research initiatives in health areas identified as priorities by Zambians and Ghanaians.http://youtu.be/0cFGsFr3DLw

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Food Security, Hunger, Livelihood and Poverty in Urban India


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Photo One - Food Security, Hunger, Livelihood and Poverty in Urban India Photo Two - Food Security, Hunger, Livelihood and Poverty in Urban India

India is a land of sharp contrasts. According to the NCEUS (2007) report, India’s real income grew by 125% during the economic reform period of 1992-1993 and 2005-2006. The per capita income has increased by 77% during the same period. These indications show that people should supposedly have increased their living standards considerably. Despite the average of 6% annual economic growth rate, 77% of India’s people live below Rs. 20 (roughly 0.40 CAD); India is the capital of malnutrition of the world and the largest growing sector of this country is the inequality. Millions of women and girls are trying to support their families by working in difficult and unsanitary conditions with little financial gain.Dr. Kanchan Sarker focuses his research on: schemes for food security in urban Indian areas relating to social protection for the poor; and increasing the availability of civic amenities and infrastructure, as well as to help with issues such as domestic violence, for female workers in Mumbai’s urban slums. The objectives of this research are to show how best the working poor can gain access to better nutrition and how woman can gain access to basic services such as housing, water, electricity, sanitation facilities, sewage disposal and protection from violence.

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Integrative Physiological Adaptation to High-Altitude


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Photo One - Integrative Physiological Adaptation to High-Altitude Photo Two - Integrative Physiological Adaptation to High-Altitude

Dr. Philip Ainslie focuses his research on the integrated mechanisms which regulate human cerebral blood flow in health and disease. The most important task for the circulatory system is to maintain blood flow for the brain; this process is crucial to regulate breathing, especially during exercise. Recent findings of Dr. Ainslie’s research team have shown that blood flow increases during exercise and this plays a critical role in regulating breathing. Using brain images at rest and during exercise, this research examines the mechanisms in which brain blood flow influences breathing rate, how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to high altitude and how long term exposure to high altitude may lead to biological adaptations to the mechanisms that control blood flow and breathing rate. The Pyramid Laboratory at the base of Mount Everest is 5,050 meters above sea level (compared to Kelowna located 344 meters above sea level). Dr. Ainslie, a mountaineer that has climbed Everest seven times, conducts high altitude research in the fully equipped laboratory located in the Khumbu Valley near Lobuche, Nepal. The types of experiments that are conducted range from cerebrovascular, cardiopulmonary and neurocognitive health. Members of Dr. Ainslie’s research team include researchers, sleep technicians, physicians, a bioengineer and a hardware/software specialist. Findings from this research will contribute to universal knowledge of the human cerebrovascular system and contribute to many topics including: blood flow, breathing, sleep apnea and high altitude stress, among many others.

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Immigrants' Housing Experience in the Outer Suburbs of Vancouver and Toronto


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Photo One - Immigrants' Housing Experience in the Outer Suburbs of Vancouver and Toronto

Before immigrants can be successfully integrated into a new society, they much have several basic needs met. In cities such as Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal, this has been a long concern, as well as being an increasing issue in the growing outer suburbs of major metropolitan areas where the supply of affordable housing and immigrant settlement services is limited. Dr. Carlos Teixeira studies the social characteristics and housing experiences of immigrants in the rental and homeownership markets of the outer suburbs of Vancouver (Richmond and Surrey) and Toronto (Markham, Richmond Hill, and Vaughan).Housing costs in the rental and homeownership markets determine who can afford to move to the outer suburbs. Since immigration has been identified as an engine of economic growth, the fact that newcomers face barriers in securing affordable housing in the outer suburbs has policy implications of interest to politicians, planners, and community workers. Dr. Teixeira's research will focus on the housing experiences of recent immigrants and refugees who arrived in Canada between 2000 and 2010 and who are living in the outer suburbs of Vancouver and Toronto. Specifically, the affordability, suitability and adequacy of the housing occupied by recent immigrants will be investigated. The findings of this study will provide new information as well as recommendations for improving housing for new immigrants in the outer suburbs.

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Breadfruit in the 21st Century


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Photo One - Breadfruit in the 21st Century Photo Two - Breadfruit in the 21st Century

Breadfruit is a traditional crop grown throughout the Pacific for more than 3,000 years. However, its diversity is now declining due to damage from tropical cyclones, climate change, and loss of cultural knowledge. Dr. Susan Murch is working with breadfruit and hopes not only to prevent the fruit from further decline but would like to make it much more abundant. Breadfruit is a high-energy food that in abundance will improve food security in tropical regions and create new food products for North American tables. For example, flour made from breadfruit is gluten-free, is high in protein and several vitamins, and is being investigated as a source of highly nutritious food. Further, starch from breadfruit has a potential value as being a hypoallergenic binding agent and industrial chemical for pharmaceutical manufacture. Murch continues to research breadfruit, the process of cultivating breadfruit and the very many applications it can be used for. http://youtu.be/Vb8_f1K6FZA

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Water Governance and Agriculture in the Columbia River Basin


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Photo One - Water Governance and Agriculture in the Columbia River Basin Photo Two - Water Governance and Agriculture in the Columbia River Basin

The Columbia River is the fourth largest river by volume in North America, exceeded only by the Mississippi, MacKenzie and St. Lawrence, and it is the largest river on the continent that empties into the Pacific Ocean. It represents a vitally important resource to both Canada and the USA, but only some aspects of its management are subject to international agreement. The Columbia River Treaty was implemented in 1964 for a sixty year term and agencies in both countries are now involved in studies and consultations that will determine whether or not the treaty will be renewed, renegotiated or terminated. The purpose of the original treaty was to facilitate the construction of additional storage facilities, mailing in Canada, for the purposes of flood control and power generation. Dr. John Wagner has created a research project that allows him to gather information about the overall governance system in the Columbia River Basin while conduction in-depth research at one representative site in Canada (the Creston Valley of BC) and another in the United States (Moses Lake in Washington). The resulting data from this project will be used to generate policy recommendations regarding the future of agriculture in the basin and the relation of a renegotiated Columbia River Treaty to the overall governance system.Large international rivers like the Columbia are widely distributed throughout the world and are particularly problematic from a governance perspective because of their cultural, geographical, institutional, and political complexity. Rivers such as the Nile, Congo, and Zambezi in Africa, the Mekong, Brahmaputra, Ganges and Indus in Asia, and the Columbia and Colorado in North America, are all subject to varied types of international agreements, but few of these agreements have the scope of enforcement mechanisms necessary to avoid frequent and often intense conflict among the nations and communities who depend on them.

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Viticulture and Enology


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Photo One - Viticulture and Enology Photo Two - Viticulture and Enology

Wine production is the third largest agricultural industry in British Columbia with about 7,500 acres of land under cultivation for wine grapes. Ninety-two percent of the wine produced in British Columbia comes from the Okanagan Valley which has a long history of grape production beginning in 1859 when Father Charles Pandosy planted the first vineyard near Kelowna. Research in the Murch lab at UBC Okanagan is working toward understanding the phytochemical complexity of grapes and wines at different stages during the process of growth, fermentation and maturation. In a collaborative project with the Wine Research Centre at UBC Vancouver, we are working to understand the role of specific genes in the chemistry wine grapes while other projects are developing new tools for understanding flavour chemistry and the potential role of plant growth regulators in root development, drought tolerance, flower and fruit development in the vineyard.

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People's Narratives of Trauma and Its Fusion with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Model in El Salvador.


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Photo One - People's Narratives of Trauma and Its Fusion with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Model in El Salvador. Photo Two - People's Narratives of Trauma and Its Fusion with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Model in El Salvador.

This project is concerned with exploring the numerous ways in which ordinary people conceive traumatic memory, and the intersection of these local understandings with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PSTD) in El Salvador. This research mainly focuses on exploring public symbols and individual meanings of trauma as both medical and non-medical narratives of suffering. It is concerned with exploring what kinds of ideas, speech, behaviours, rituals, myths, meanings, social relations, and affective states individuals identify as manifestations of a traumatic memory. Dr. de Burgos also explores how these cultural understandings are framed within the context of newly introduced medical concepts of traumatic memory as a pathological condition in need of medical intervention. Studying the blending of local conception of trauma with medical narrative of PTSD is an important part of the anthropological study of contemporary global social problems - violence, aggression, depression, and suicide. As a medical anthropologist, Dr. de Burgos continues to research and address other issues in El Salvador, including experiences of lead contamination from a car battery factory operating in the community of Sitio del Niño since 1997. Dr. de Burgos has created a 40-minute film documenting the community's experiences. (Documentary: http://www.ubc.ca/okanagan/cssej/publishing/cssejpress/The_Site_of_Lead.html) http://youtu.be/No3B7Df3nr0

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"Continues Fine": Métis Networks and the Fur Trade in Northern BC in the early 20th Century


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Photo One - "Continues Fine": Métis Networks and the Fur Trade in Northern BC in the early 20th Century

The late 19th and early 20th century was a time of decline for the fur trade in BC no less than elsewhere in Canada. In BC's north, institutions like the Hudson's Bay Company remained important however, and the networks of kin and social connection that typified the earlier trade remained. These networks, as before, were largely made up of Métis families, and despite the defeat of the Métis in 1885, the complex sociological and economics ties that made up the Métis universe continued to shape the development of communities like Ft. St. John and Ft. St. James. This project examines the late northern fur trade through the lives and works of two traders, both of whom where firmly connected to Métis networks embedded in the trade. Both traders left journals and letters providing insight into the transitions of the time. As agents standing in between existing economic and social frameworks in which Aboriginal communities were key, and emerging ones in which these same communities were increasingly marginalized and dispossessed, the records of their lives and times speak of wider issues and processes. In this project, these records are transcribed and analysed by Dr. Evans to develop biographically centred histories of the posts, families and communities to which they were central. The transcriptions will form the core of an electronic book project and website.

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Landed Histories of the Northern Rivers Region, NSW, Australia


Mike

Photo One - Landed Histories of the Northern Rivers Region, NSW, Australia Photo Two - Landed Histories of the Northern Rivers Region, NSW, Australia

The Landed Histories Project is a collaboration between Southern Cross University and UBC Okanagan researchers and food producers in the Northern Rivers. It aims to develop a series of case studies of land histories in the region, to explore diverse local responses to the changing economic, social, cultural and ecological dimensions of food production. The aim of our work in 2012-13 has been to develop Landed Histories as a methodological approach, which we offer to other researchers, community groups, and individuals beyond the Northern Rivers as a unique lens to consider both the past and the future of agriculture and land-use more generally.

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Timber plantation water use


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Photo One - Timber plantation water use

Analysis of paired catchment experiments in South Africa

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Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe Photo Two - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe

Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe. Abstract: This project aims to empirically investigate how neoliberalisation of the academy — especially as it is experienced through research assessment, rankings, key performance indicators, benchmarking, and similar audit processes — has affected academic knowledge production in the Social Sciences, and if so, to document what some of the key impacts might be. The present research is undertaken in five jurisdictions that are ‘representative’ of both the Nordic countries and Northern Europe: Iceland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The research involves individual interviews with academics (social scientists), interviews with key informants, and discourse analysis of documentary evidence.

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Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe Photo Two - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe

Abstract: This project aims to empirically investigate how neoliberalisation of the academy — especially as it is experienced through research assessment, rankings, key performance indicators, benchmarking, and similar audit processes — has affected academic knowledge production in the Social Sciences, and if so, to document what some of the key impacts might be. The present research is undertaken in five jurisdictions that are ‘representative’ of both the Nordic countries and Northern Europe: Iceland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The research involves individual interviews with academics (social scientists), interviews with key informants, and discourse analysis of documentary evidence.

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Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe Photo Two - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe

Abstract: This project aims to empirically investigate how neoliberalisation of the academy — especially as it is experienced through research assessment, rankings, key performance indicators, benchmarking, and similar audit processes — has affected academic knowledge production in the Social Sciences, and if so, to document what some of the key impacts might be. The present research is undertaken in five jurisdictions that are ‘representative’ of both the Nordic countries and Northern Europe: Iceland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The research involves individual interviews with academics (social scientists), interviews with key informants, and discourse analysis of documentary evidence

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Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe Photo Two - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe

Abstract: This project aims to empirically investigate how neoliberalisation of the academy — especially as it is experienced through research assessment, rankings, key performance indicators, benchmarking, and similar audit processes — has affected academic knowledge production in the Social Sciences, and if so, to document what some of the key impacts might be. The present research is undertaken in five jurisdictions that are ‘representative’ of both the Nordic countries and Northern Europe: Iceland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The research involves individual interviews with academics (social scientists), interviews with key informants, and discourse analysis of documentary evidence.

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Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe Photo Two - Auditing the Academy: A Comparative Study of Neoliberalism and Academic Knowledge Production in Northern Europe

Abstract: This project aims to empirically investigate how neoliberalisation of the academy — especially as it is experienced through research assessment, rankings, key performance indicators, benchmarking, and similar audit processes — has affected academic knowledge production in the Social Sciences, and if so, to document what some of the key impacts might be. The present research is undertaken in five jurisdictions that are ‘representative’ of both the Nordic countries and Northern Europe: Iceland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The research involves individual interviews with academics (social scientists), interviews with key informants, and discourse analysis of documentary evidence.

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The Cultural Politics of Naming Places: the Case of Whanganui, Aotearoa


Lawrence D. Berg

Photo One - The Cultural Politics of Naming Places: the Case of Whanganui, Aotearoa Photo Two - The Cultural Politics of Naming Places: the Case of Whanganui, Aotearoa

This project analyzes the contestation over (re)naming Whanganui in the mid-2000s in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is part of a larger project that examines the colonial politics of place-naming in white settler societies like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the USA. (Photo source: adapted from Georgewille, Wikimedia Commons. Used with permission under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike Unported 3.0 License).

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Graduate Projects


UBC Okanagan Research

Place-marks in this layer represent research project by Graduate Students

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Indigenous (First Nation, Metis & Inuit) Women's Maternal Health


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Photo One - Indigenous (First Nation, Metis & Inuit) Women's Maternal Health

Jennifer Leason, a graduate student in Community, Culture and Global Studies, is exploring the relationship between indigenous women's maternal health (pregnancy, birth and postpartum), and key complex and interrelated health determinants (such as age, sexual orientation, geographic location, education, etc.). Through the conducting and statistical analysis of Leason's Maternity Experiences Survey with urban indigenous women in Kelowna and Vernon, BC, she will examine the maternal health-events and experiences, health characteristics and sociological complex interrelated health-determinant patterns in indigenous women's maternal health.Leason aims to address risk factors associated with maternal health outcomes and create suggestions for improving policy and programming specific to indigenous women's maternal health. Her goal with this project is to improve the health of indigenous women and to provide recommendations for more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system.

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Care transitions for patients with chronic illness: from emergency department to home


Aline Acosta

Photo One - Care transitions for patients with chronic illness: from emergency department to home

Background: Patients undergoing transitions from one practice setting to another are at risk for fragmented care and deficits in the quality of care. This is particularly important for patients with chronic illness given their complex continuing care needs. Gaps in care at the interface between emergency department (ED) and community services are common in Brazil with little research on this topic. Objective: To analyze care transitions of patients with chronic illness from ED to home in Brazil. Methods: A three phase sequential explanatory mixed methods study will be carried out in a large urban hospital in south Brazil. 1) Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Care Transitions Measure (CTM) with an expert committee and patients from clinical inpatient units (Total=180 patients); 2) Evaluating the quality of care transition using the Brazilian version of CTM with 325 patients discharged from ED to home by telephone interview; 3) Conducting a focus group with ED nurses to discuss interventions to improve the quality of care transitions.

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Patient Safety Culture: A mixed method study on the perceptions of the multidisciplinary team


Elisiane

Photo One - Patient Safety Culture: A mixed method study on the perceptions of the multidisciplinary team

Background: Patient safety issues, including how to build a culture of safety, have captured global attention since the 1999 Institute of Medicine report: "To err is Human" provided estimated numbers of deaths related to adverse events in U.S. health care institutions. However, research on safety culture within the multidisciplinary health care team is still a new field of inquiry in Brazil. Hypothesis: We postulated that the safety culture of any health care institution transects several spheres, and is embedded in the attitudes and decision-making of managers and administrators. Objectives: Our objective was to evaluate perceptions of safety culture and management within a multidisciplinary team working in Advanced Centers of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Southern Brazil. Methods: Our study incorporates a form of systems thinking used in the field of ecological restoration to interpret and clarify variables involving patient safety. We used a cross-sectional exploratory and descriptive design with sequential quantitative and qualitative methods including the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, focus groups, participatory photographic methods and thematic content analysis. Results/Conclusions: This study received ethics approval in early 2015 and data collection will commence in Spring of 2015. We expect the results to provide insights into aspects involving the management of the unit and the institution that impact patient safety.

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Metis Identity


Gabrielle Legault

Photo One - Metis Identity Photo Two - Metis Identity

My PhD research explores how indigenous, and specifically Métis, subjectivities are reproduced through collectively drawing on aspects of nationalism including the repetition of particular historical narratives. A central goal of the project was to understand the multiple ways in which Métis identity is and has been constructed, developed, maintained, represented, and expressed in British Columbia. The research process involved conducting interviews with self-identifying Métis peoples, including service providers, politicians, artists, youth and elders. As a Métis community member, it was important to me that my research was community supported and conducted in a way that was respectful of participants and the knowledge that they shared.

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